Sometimes, two dissimilar things can complement each other quite nicely. A light sundress and some serious gladiators. Bright green walls and brown curtains.

The options are endless, and the same applies to wine.

Sometimes, two dissimilar things can complement each other quite nicely. A light sundress and some serious gladiators. Bright green walls and brown curtains.

The options are endless, and the same applies to wine.

Dennis Domini gave us a look at the white-wine selections he offers as manager of department manager at The Andersons on Brice Road.

In these bottles, the grapes listed as the majority ingredients likewise make up most of the wine's character. But the small amounts of other varietals, when combined, put a distinctly different edge on things, Domini said.

"For example, when they put in Muscat and Reisling, it takes the edge off drier wines," he said. "It's adding residual sugar, which changes the profile of that bottle significantly."

White-wine blends are made in regions that span the globe and are more plentiful than people think, he said.

In some cases, producers ferment each grape separately, blending everything together prior to bottling and adding to the bottle's complexity. Others process the grapes all at once.

Some producers come up with proprietary names for their brews; others call them "white table wine" and decline to reveal exactly what varietals are combined within the bottle, adding an element of intrigue like the Conundrum described below.

Here are some summer suggestions.

Conundrum White Table Wine (2007)
Region: Monterey County, California
Cost: $28
Grapes: Sauvignon blanc, Muscat Canelli, Chardonnay and Viognier
Flavors: lush, lively citrus fruits, melons, pears and some floral
Pairs well with: fish or lobster, grilled or roast chicken

Waterbrook Melange (2007)
Region: Columbia Valley, Washington
Cost: $16
Grapes: Gewurtztraminer, Riesling, Viognier, Chardonnay, Pinot gris, Sauvignon blanc, Muscat Canelli
Flavors: creamy apricots and peaches lead to a bright, clean finish
Pairs well with: fish with a lemon-garlic butter

Hayman & Hill Interchange (2007)
Region: Santa Barbara County, California
Cost: $10 (sale)
Grapes: Sauvignon blanc, Chardonnay, Muscat, Riesling
Flavors: bright citrus and other tropical fruits with a mineral acidity
Pairs well with: fish or more-delicate red meats