Clintonville resident Christine Cooper Hill is not a bling-y kind of gal. But the 45-year-old artist has made her life - and a good one, at that-crafting jewelry.

Clintonville resident Christine Cooper Hill is not a bling-y kind of gal. But the 45-year-old artist has made her life - and a good one, at that - crafting jewelry. Besides meticulously making custom rings, necklaces and more for clientele at the Diamond Cellar, the Columbus College of Art & Design alum also makes goods for her own jewelry line.

What sparked your interest in jewelry?
It was a little bit of an accident. I had been working on painting in school, and when I got out, I went to work for a jewelry manufacturer. I became fluent with what they were doing there very quickly.

Had you always been a fashionista?
I'm not. And I even laugh now, because I'm not into bling. The designs I do are sort of scaled back, simple, more humble.

What inspires your designs?
My husband and I are collectors of antiques from the arts-and-crafts movement-from the early 20th and late 19th century. All of their designs are extremely simple. They usually reference nature. I typically do very organic things, and I look at a lot of textiles from that period - they have loops and organic lines.

What else makes you tick?
I have been practicing yoga for about eight years. I like the physical practice, but I also like the sort of spiritual literature that goes into that, and the idea of life as a path and learning to make choices that are good and healthy for you. I read a lot about arts and crafts and those kinds of things. I enjoy traveling and cooking and my garden. My husband-he's just about my favorite person in the world.

What cause is closest to your heart?
My favorite charity is Lifeline of Ohio. I donated a kidney to my dad a few years ago. It's an amazing [organization] that we have right here in Columbus, that they're able to take care of so many people.


Christine Cooper Hill's jewelry is available at the Diamond Cellar; see it at www.christinecooperhill.com.

Kristy Eckert is editor of Capital Style.