Stressed? Depending on your personal approach to excess demands at work or home or an emotionally turbulent time in your life, the tension can manifest itself in many ways.

Stressed? Depending on your personal approach to excess demands at work or home or an emotionally turbulent time in your life, the tension can manifest itself in many ways.

Your appetite might disappear, or you may eat everything in sight. The pressure might prompt you to monkey with your routines, including self care and exercise. Whatever your stress response, chances are good that your appearance will suffer.

When women are stressed, certain chemicals and hormones in the body get revved up and contribute to various problems, said Dr. Stephanie Cotell, who works at Northeast Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery Center, which is affiliated with Mount Carmel East.

Here are some of the prime areas where Cotell said you may notice stress.

On your skin

If you are acne-prone, here come the breakouts. If you have psoriasis or rosacea, expect it to worsen. More frowning also equals more wrinkles. And sometimes when you're stressed, you become dehydrated, which can contribute to less-than-fresh-looking skin. Perspiration might also be in overdrive.

Around your eyes

Lack of sleep and too much stress can make for dark circles and bags.

Your hair

Stress can contribute to hair loss, most commonly a type called telogen effluvium. Physical or emotional stress-often from a major event such as a death or divorce-can push hair roots prematurely into the resting phase, which makes them fall out. Normally, the hair follicles become active again in a month or two and hair returns.

Your nails

Picking or chewing at your cuticles or nails not only makes for unsightly hands, but can also lead to infection or abnormalities in nail growth.

Your lips

Cold sores and fever blisters may seem to come out of nowhere during stressful times.

On the scale

Frazzled people don't always make the best food choices. Most often, that means jeans get snug. For some people, though, stress erodes the appetite.