A new year brings new resolutions, and a healthier lifestyle might be on the top of your list. Natalie Stephens, registered and licensed dietician and owner of Gahanna's Mid-Ohio Nutrition Therapy, Inc., provided Capital Style with ten tips to give you and your family a healthier 2010.

A new year brings new resolutions, and a healthier lifestyle might be on the top of your list. Natalie Stephens, registered and licensed dietician and owner of Gahanna's Mid-Ohio Nutrition Therapy, Inc., provided Capital Style with ten tips to give you and your family a healthier 2010.

1.Water over soda. Limiting the amount of sodas you drink (even diet sodas) can help with weight loss. While diet sodas are calorie free, they still teach your brain to enjoy sweets. When the diet soda isn't around, you're more likely to fall prey to tempting sugary snacks.

2.Go whole grain. Increase your fiber and decrease your bloating. This can make you feel and look like you've lost weight in a matter of days. Fiber is slow to digest, so you'll feel full faster and longer which will help you eat fewer calories over the course of the day.

3.Be colorful. Eating from the 5 color food groups will increase fiber intake, and provide antioxidants for cancer prevention. The color groups are: red, orange/yellow, green, blue/purple, and white.

4.Get lean. Trim fats off meats, remove skin from poultry, watch ratios on ground meats (90/10 ground sirloin, 99% fat free ground turkey) and overall, don't fry! All these methods will save calories, and improve heart health by lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels.

5.Low fat dairy. Build and maintain strong healthy bones and fight heart disease by choosing skim or 1% milk, low fat cheese/cottage cheese/sour cream/yogurt. There is evidence that a diet containing 3 servings of dairy per day helps with weight loss.

6.Vegetarian for a day. A new food trend is skipping meat one day a week to limit fats, cut calories and save a few bucks. Substitute beans, nuts or soy and still get your protein. Many flavorful options are available in the freezer section from Morningstar Farms. Trader Joes and Whole Foods have their own brands of vegetarian dishes as well.

7.Skip the salt. The American Heart Association recommends 1,500-2,300 mg of sodium daily depending on your risk factors. One teaspoon of salt contains 2,300 mg of sodium! By substituting fresh onion and garlic, or herbs and spices in place of salt, you'll retain less fluid, which improves blood pressure and decreases bloating and swelling.

8.Bust a move. Following a healthy diet can still lead to gaining weight if you don't burn those calories off. Thirty minutes of moderately intense exercise is recommended most days of the week. Make it a goal to get moving everyday. If you can't make it to the gym, go dancing, do yard work or ride a bike. Exercise can be fun.

9.Be fat savvy. MUFA's, PUFA's, trans and saturated: Do you know the difference? Mono- and poly-unsaturated fats are healthy fats from plants (usually liquid at room temperature). Saturated and trans fats are "bad" fats that raise LDL (bad) cholesterol and are generally solid at room temperature. All fats, no matter what type, are around 120 calories per tablespoon, so still use them in moderation.

10.Variety is key. Eating from all the food groups will ensure a balanced diet, but eating different kinds of food within each food group will give you a lot of vitamins and minerals you may be missing. This will improve energy levels, fight colds and expand your overall health profile.