The Nov. 5 ballot will offer Columbus voters the option of approving two ballot issues: Issues 50 and 51. The former asks permission to create an independent auditor position in the district. The latter focuses on academic achievement and innovation, funding the recommended improvements laid out by the mayor's education commission.

The Nov. 5 ballot will offer Columbus voters the option of approving two ballot issues: Issues 50 and 51. The former asks permission to create an independent auditor position in the district. The latter focuses on academic achievement and innovation, funding the recommended improvements laid out by the mayor's education commission. The 9.01 mill bond-levy package would provide the district with $515 million over five years. In return, the district has promised not to ask for any additional dollars via a levy until 2018 and to reduce the district's spending by $200 million during that time. Here's where the money is slated to go over five years:

1 mill* ($42.5 million)would be used to establish pre-kindergarten programs at no cost to parents for 4,800 students.

0.8 mills ($33 million)would go toward increasing technology, including providing a computer for every child in high and middle school and one computer for every four children in elementary schools and updating classroom technology.

1 mill ($42.5 million)would be dedicated to increasing enrollment at high-performing city schools and replicating successful techniques at those deemed not high-performing.

1 mill ($42.5 million)would dedicate similar resources but at the community (aka charter) school level to ensure these nonprofit schools are high-performing.

1 mill ($42.5 million)would help fund a public-private partnership designed to act as an advocate for education. The money would be spent on the partnership's recommended actions. One example of a possible initiative: the attraction, retention and training of high-quality teachers and principals.

0.1 mill (estimated $5 million)would fund the independent auditor position designed to maintain checks and balances within the district.

3.1 mills ($132 million)would be reserved for improved district operations. That includes creating better business and academic operations, ensuring all kids can attend an A or B school and using school buildings as community centers.

4.7 mills (no
dollar value, but no reduction in property taxation)would dedicate resources of the Financial Review Standing Committee (a Board of Education committee) to reduce the district's budget by $200 million over the next five years.

1.01 mills (bond issue worth $175 million)would be put toward facility improvements, such as 10 new construction, renovation and maintenance projects, providing Wi-Fi access to all school buildings and improving access to technology during this transition.

*Millage or mill is a term used to describe the property tax rate in tenths of a cent applied to the value of a home. In this instance, a levy value of 9.01 mills will cost the owner of a $100,000 home an additional $315 a year in taxes.