Exploring museums is a great way to get out of the house during winter. Instead of heading to the usual spots this year, why not check out a few off the beaten path?

Exploring museums is a great way to get out of the house during winter. Instead of heading to the usual spots this year, why not check out a few off the beaten path?

In the 1920s, Ernest "Mooney" Warther crafted intricate model trains and handmade knives, while his wife collected more than 73,000 buttons. "There's some hobbies here that got a little out of control," says their grandson Mark Warther, who now runs The Warther Museum with his son Patrick. The museum, founded in 1963, offers guided tours of the collections and knife factory. 331 Karl Ave., Dover, warthers.com

By the time the Rev. Paul Johnson died in 2010, he had accumulated more than 3,400 pencil sharpeners. His wife donated the collection, which became the Paul A. Johnson Pencil Sharpener Museum, to the Hocking Hills Regional Welcome Center. "We reset the collection based on photographs," says Karen Raymore, executive director of the Hocking Hills Tourism Association. 13178 state Route 664 S, Logan, explorehockinghills.com

"It got out of control-especially from my wife's perspective," says Steve McVoy of his antique TV collection. In 2001, he renovated a warehouse in Hilliard and founded the Early Television Foundation and Museum, which now displays about 150 TVs. "The kids like it because it's sort of unbelievable to them," he says. 5396 Franklin St., Hilliard, earlytelevision.org