Using two 2013 looks, we asked makeup artists to show us what it takes to make a runway-ready model just in time for this year's HighBall, Oct. 24 and 25.

Preparation for HighBall's main event, the costume couture fashion show, begins months in advance when designers start planning their collections. Once they've designed the costumes, they work with makeup artists from Reverse Vanity Spa and hairstylists from Phia Salon to create the final looks. Using two 2013 looks, we asked makeup artists to show us what it takes to make a runway-ready model just in time for this year's HighBall, Oct. 24 and 25. shortnorth.org

"Voodoo"

Costume designer: Ashley Wills

Makeup artist: Nicole DiTommaso

Model: DaRissa Hayes-Moore

The look: "I was originally pulling inspiration from images of tribal voodoo priestesses," Wills says. "I loved how the look was inherently feminine, but also had a very gritty and almost spooky appeal that I thought would be great for HighBall."

With any makeup application, it's best to start with a fresh face: "cleaning, concealing, creating a fresh canvas for the art piece to really shine," DiTommaso says.

DiTommaso starts by drawing blocky red and yellow lines on the cheeks using face paint.

Then she adds more detail-black strips above the eyebrows, white dots to accent the colored lines. Although she has the designer's idea in mind, she's not working off of an exact schematic. "Everyone has such different features," she says.

She creates a dark shade on the eyelids with a mix of black and gold eye shadow and false lashes.

Using airbrush makeup, which is thinner than standard makeup, DiTommaso adds a sheer finish by hand.

Instead of using color on the lips, she applies white paint to create a natural look.

"The Knight"

Costume designer: Olivia Mitchell

Makeup artist: Liz Koehler

Model: Kaylee Rose

The look: "My overall collection was based off of the theme of chess, so naturally the knight is a powerful piece on the board," Mitchell says.

Koehler starts by making the eyes look hollowed using dark brown eye shadow.

She then uses the lightest shade of makeup she has to make the model's face look white and matte, blending the eye makeup as she goes.

"The original idea was to do a colored mask to set off the eyes," Koehler says. But to create a darker look, she decided to move the color down to the cheeks, fading shades of yellow into orange.

Koehler adds more interest to the eyes with false lashes and a dark maroon shade near the eyebrows. She applies mascara on the lashes to make them look thicker.

She finishes the look with a coral lip liner, an orange-red lip tint and some gloss to add shine.