Story & photos by Jodi Miller

Spend any amount of time in a restaurant kitchen, and you begin to notice something. In the midst of chaos, one detail is always in order -- the chef's knives.

At G. Michael's, David Tetzloff's knives sit orderly on a white linen napkin. Timothy Carter, executive sous chef at Mitchell's Steakhouse Downtown, puts his away in a wooden box in his office.

And Columbus' legendary chef Hartmut Handke (now retired) marks his knives with a thin strip of yellow tape around the handle. "Even if you are working in y our own kitchen," he explains, "you want to know where your knives are."

I recently visited a few kitchens around the city where the knife is king.

Tim Carter, Mitchell's Steakhouse

Hartmut Handke

Christopher Spreng, C. William's Bistro

Phuong Mai, Indochine Cafe

Bob Burton, Weiland's Gourmet Market