Goetta is one of those regional delicacies that means very little to outsiders, but it's a taste of home to someone who ate it growing up. First things first: it's pronounced "get-uh." As the sign says at The Diner in Powell: "The O is silent, until you try it."

Editor's Note: Crave contributor Nicholas Dekker blogs about breakfast at breakfastwithnick.com

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When mention goetta to someone, you'll get one of two reactions:

"Huh?"

Or

"I love goetta! I prefer Glier's over Queen City. We used to eat it by…"

You get the idea. Goetta is one of those regional delicacies that means very little to outsiders, but it's a taste of home to someone who ate it growing up.

First things first: it's pronounced "get-uh." As the sign says at The Diner in Powell: "The O is silent, until you try it."

Goetta is similar to the Pennsylvania Dutch delicacy of scrapple (which may elicit the same reactions). It's made from meat scraps left over from butchering pork--the pieces that are too small to sell as individual cuts are ground, mixed with seasonings like salt, pepper and herbs, rolled in steel cut oats, then sliced and fried. (Scrapple is made the same way but with flour and cornmeal.)

The dish originates with thrifty German immigrants to the Cincinnati area who used every scrap of meat out of necessity. It's usually served in fried slices with breakfast, although some restaurants have layered it on sandwiches, crumbled it on pizza or folded it into omelets as well.

In Columbus you can find goetta at Thurn's Specialty Meats or Weiland's Gourmet Market, as well as most Kroger stores. It comes wrapped in tubes much like ground sausage, and most often it's found alongside other ground or prepared meats like sausage, hot dogs and brats. The two most popular brands are Glier's or Queen City, with Glier's leading the way (they own the website goetta.com).

Glier's makes original, hot and turkey goetta. And just recently the delicacy came available at a new Powell eatery simply called The Diner (240 N. Liberty St.), where thin patties are offered with your breakfast next to meat choices like bacon, sausage and ham.

If you're up for a day trip this August, head down to Cincinnati for Glier's Goettafest. Celebrate a little bit of southwest Ohio history by strolling the riverfront and sampling every imaginable preparation of goetta.