Now that gourmet pizza is a bona fide movement here (it seems we've witnessed a wood-fired pie spot sprout in just about every neighborhood), it takes some serious work to make a pizza place stand out.

Now that gourmet pizza is a bona fide movement here (it seems we've witnessed a wood-fired pie spot sprout in just about every neighborhood), it takes some serious work to make a pizza place stand out.

Natalie Jackson figured out how to do it.

The menu at Natalie's Coal-Fired Pizza, the place she opened with her dad, Charlie, last August, is straightforward-fresh dough made in-house with a 100-year-old sourdough starter, topped with fresher-than-fresh toppings. The pizzas go into the clean-burning anthracite coal oven, and 1,000 degrees later, they're rendered appealingly blistered and charred, covered in dollops of melted fresh mozzarella.

Jackson's got a pizza pedigree-she worked at Gio's Pizza in Circleville as a high schooler. But it was while eating her way through pizzerias in New York City after college that she discovered the coal-firing technique and decided she wanted to bring it back to her hometown.

"For me, it's all about the taste. It's just such a different style from everything else I'd seen here," Jackson says. "It gets all crispy and dark and a little burnt, and I just love that."

And while the pizzas pair perfectly with a craft brew from the extensive beer list, they're best enjoyed with Natalie's other specialty-nightly live music from local and national jazz, folk and Americana acts (booked with help from her dad, who's got years of experience in the concert business).

"We're really trying to establish ourselves as a music venue just as much as a restaurant-a place where you can sit and enjoy a good show and feel comfortable," she says.

Next up, Jackson's toying with the idea of opening for brunch: Their sourdough starter, she says, is just as good for pancakes as it is for pizza dough. She's trying to determine the best way to incorporate live music alongside a weekend-morning meal.

"Sometimes it seems we serve two completely different audiences: those that are die-hard fans of our food and a completely different group that's die-hard for our music," Jackson says. "The great thing is that we accommodate both."