That Food Truck made its debut in July of last summer, which means it missed gigs at the city's first two food truck festivals and just about the entire summer festival season. And yet chef Dan Kraus' snout-to-tail food made such a splash during that inaugural shortened season, That Food Truck won multiple best food truck of the year accolades.

That Food Truck made its debut in July of last summer, which means it missed gigs at the city's first two food truck festivals and just about the entire summer festival season. And yet chef Dan Kraus' snout-to-tail food made such a splash during that inaugural shortened season, That Food Truck won multiple best food truck of the year accolades.

If you think that's impressive, just wait until you see what these guys have dreamed up for their second year. First up is Saturday brunch service at Seventh Son, where they're wowing with mole-topped brisket benedict and focaccia French toast.

That focaccia comes courtesy of fellow food trucker Matt Swint, who has joined forces with Kraus and co-owner Steve Concilla this year. The bus formerly home to Swint's Perzoot will be renamed and rebranded as a retro diner serving high-end burgers and hot dogs plus root beer and ice cream truck novelty treats.

Kraus and Concilla also bought a smoker, in which they plan to start preparing whole hogs by mid-June. Your smoked pork shoulder might come with a beef jus encapsulation thanks to another new collaborator, Tim Jones, a culinary school buddy of Kraus who has a thing for playing around with molecular gastronomy.

And Kraus, who has a 4-year-old named Remy with his wife Caroline, also hopes to roll out family-sized, KFC-style buckets with smoked whole chickens and all the fixings priced at $40 for four people.

Phew.

Of all his varied roles, though, Kraus is most proud to be a butcher.

"Butchers are a dying breed, so to speak. There's not a lot of people doing whole-animal butchery in this city," he says. "People will get whole fabricated cuts, like bellies, but not many are getting the whole cow with the head, and breaking it down."

And Kraus proceeds to use every part of the animal-cooking the liver and kidneys, rendering the fat into lard and making stock using the bones.

Long-term, Kraus says he'd love to parlay the truck into an intimate 30-seat restaurant, where he can serve small groups of people with the food he loves to cook.

"I work 80 hours a week but it doesn't feel like it," Kraus says, "because it's mine and I enjoy doing it."