Tyrone and Marcella Jackson want to make frankfurters that become known as Columbus' hot dog, similar to Nathan's in New York or Vienna Beef in Chicago.

Tyrone and Marcella Jackson want to make frankfurters that become known as Columbus' hot dog, similar to Nathan's in New York or Vienna Beef in Chicago.

It's a noble goal. But it's actually secondary to the couple's ultimate vision for the Good Frank-to create a school that empowers people to move out of poverty and into entrepreneurship.

Just look at all the things that go into making one simple hot dog and selling it from a cart, they say: gardening, farming, meatpacking, smoking, welding, plumbing, graphic design.

"You can go through our program, as simple as it is, and there are 30 different career tracks you can be inspired to see," says Tyrone, who plans to fund his Ganesha School through profits from the hot dog cart, while using the business itself as the learning-by-doing curriculum.

The inspiration to make all-natural, hand-crafted frankfurters and sausages came when the couple lived in Nashville, where they operated a small fleet of hot dog carts. When a customer complained that their stand wasn't kosher, they realized how little they knew about the product they were selling.

"The next day we called all of our suppliers and asked them where their meat was coming from. Nobody could tell us where it came from or anything about it," Tyrone says. "We decided to shut down our business until we found a quality product."

Unfortunately, they quickly realized there are few existing supply lines to get the kind of sustainable, grass-fed meats they were seeking. Unwilling to reopen their business with inferior product, the Jacksons left their home in Nashville and moved in with Marcella's parents in Ohio.

"We came up here with very little, next to nothing. We just tried to absorb the shock of the whole thing," Tyrone says. "And one day as I was driving I decided I wasn't going to let life hand me this kind of defeat. I was going to rebuild the business, if I had to raise the cow myself."

So the Jacksons started again from the beginning: They went to work at a farm, then learned to make their own hot dogs.

Good Frank's all-beef franks and beef-and-pork stadium franks are hand-made in small batches using meat sourced from local farms, and they're packed at a smokehouse in Marshallville.

For now, you can find Good Frank hot dogs at Clintonville Community Market and Hills Markets, and the Jacksons are in talks to get them into Whole Foods stores. Their vegan franks are featured on the menu at Dirty Frank's.

At its base, the hot dog cart is a method of teaching by example while at the same time empowering people to believe they can do it themselves, too.

"This is not really about the hot dogs. We love hot dogs, but it can be applied to anything," Tyrone says. "We want to encourage people to believe in themselves. You really can create the life and the world that you want."