In our enlightened city in our enlightened era of drinking, there seem to be libations suitable for every persuasion and every occasion. This got me thinking about quaffs that could cool you off even as they heated you up.

In our enlightened city in our enlightened era of drinking, there seem to be libations suitable for every persuasion and every occasion. This got me thinking about quaffs that could cool you off even as they heated you up.

I'm talking about getting lit on chili-kissed cocktails in which icy and spicy opposites attract imbibers who dig a little fire in their chilled liquid. Naturally bloody marys came to mind, but since they're so obvious-and comprise their own topic-I cast my cups further asea and came up with these delightfully hot cold drinks (or is it cold hot?), found and downed in enlightened local buzz-on establishments.

Vampiro, Cuco's ($5)

I love the reversed-order imagery of sucking on a vampire. And I love this unusually diverse, luchador-sounding concoction made with Mexican grapefruit soda, tequila, fresh lime juice and the all-important sangrita (note the "t").

FYI: Sangrita, i.e. "little blood," is an authentic Mexican chaser for tequila shots made with chili, orange juice, lime juice and tomato juice.

Delving into this light blood-colored monster from a tall salt-rimmed glass and feeling its rush of complex, fizzy gas-propelled fruity flavors finish in a peppery-hot gash brings its name into focus.

More seductive with each sip, it intoxicates your palate with an elixir your taste buds simply aren't ready for; then its spiky chili teeth attack you like a ghoul with a vampire-sting that bewitches you into desiring it again.

Bonfire of the Vanities, Rigsby's Kitchen ($10)

Ever smart and in the vanguard, Rigsby's has been experimenting with rare-around-these-parts amari (digestivo-oriented bitter Italian liqueurs), and this elegant-yet-ornery quaff stars a rhubarb amaro called Zucca Rabarbaro.

The garnet-tinted, coupe-vased bonfire starts with a pretty bouquet of berries emanating from rye infused with roasted strawberries. Those cool round flavors quickly tighten into (semi-medicinal) fruity bitter notes from the amaro and black walnut bitters; then a strawberry-chipotle-syrup-ignited fire begins to explode in your mouth. It's like a slow, cumulative burn that works its way into a fully engulfing conflagration-call it a wild ride for sophisticated thrill seekers.

Dirty Burn, Barrel 44 ($8)

Cleverly created with cheap vodka steeped with peppercorns and a peck of peppers-some of them bells, some of them pickled, but most of them damn hot-this volatile, large-sized, goosed-up "dirty" martini smells like the back end of a summer garden, and kicks like the back end of a mule.

It's salty, olive-y, pickly and warn-worthy incendiary. But as it tickles your lips, sears your tongue and threatens your throat, it fills you with so much sun-scorched-month fun flavors (sissies need not apply!) you'll enjoy its dirty ol' burn.

Great Balls of Fire, Brothers Drake Meadery and Bar ($5)

This tiny drink that sparks a towering inferno should come with a disclaimer. Its detonator is a sinister, nitroglycerin-like slurp Drake makes called Hot Shot (available solo but recommended only for the walking dead, the asbestos-throated and the self-loathing), which is habanero-infused Wild Ohio Mead, emphasis on the "wild."

Great Balls of Fire also includes Brothers Drake's Apple Pie Mead and Oyo whiskey (distilled next door) and arrives in chilled dual shots form. Smelling cinnamony and tasting like an apple pie baked by Satan in a particularly nasty mood, it brings on a tongue-shriveling, sinus-purging, "Is my neck melting?" burn that lives up to its name. It's so over-the-top, I can't wait to try it again.