You may not see the methods behind each of Veritas' dishes, but you can taste their results. Here are five tools and elements that are staples in their kitchen.

You may not see the methods behind each of Veritas' dishes, but you can taste their results. Here are five tools and elements that are staples in their kitchen.

Dehydrator

Why they use it: To enhance the flavor of a stock by adding dehydrated mushrooms or for fun, small elements and garnishes on a dish.

On the menu: Black garlic, meringues, vegetable or fruit leather and pork rinds

Hydrocolloids

Why they use it: A tool used by the commercial food industry for years, these powders turn foods with a high fat content, like peanut butter or chocolate, into a powder. "With moisture it turns back to its original state. That changes people's perception of what is chocolate," says co-chef Silas Caeton.

On the menu: Dark chocolate ganache, powdered bacon fat, toasted marshmallow foam, cinnamon graham cracker ice cream, and chocolate graham cracker "twigs"

Vacuum sealer

Why they use it: To seal foods before cooking in the immersion circulator. More than a protective coating, Caeton says, because of the pressure, the chefs can infuse flavors into fruits and veggies, like adding brightness to bland jicama by sealing it with lime juice.

On the menu: Brussels sprouts with butter and spices (and the occasional edible cocktail)

Immersion circulator

Slowly cooks food in a low-temp water bath, a process known as sous vide

Why they use it: "This is the one that everyone knows us for," Caeton says, adding they'll sous vide nearly anything-meat, eggs, vegetables. The result on the latter, he says, means tender veggies cooked to the exact point of doneness. "To me, if I was a vegetarian, it's the tool I would want to have."

On the menu: A stew of 48-hour short rib, baby carrots, onion confit, marble potatoes and demi-glace

Pressure cooker

Why they use it: A standard kitchen tool that speeds up cooking time, the Veritas team uses it to quickly caramelize ingredients with a high sugar level. "We've done white chocolate carrots, which gives it a neat, sweet caramelized note," Caeton says. "It goes with our whole philosophy that we can't really create new flavors. We're trying to create textures or sensations you're not really used to. Everyone's had a carrot. But caramelize and puree it and it totally changes."

On the menu: Beet gel, caramelized coconut, caramelized butternut squash, pressure braised pork cheek and lotus root chips