When the temperature dips like it has lately (though as I am writing this, it's a seemingly balmy 20 degrees!), only a few things seem capable of breaking the chill. A great glass of red wine, preferably served in a cozy space, tops my list.

When the temperature dips like it has lately (though as I am writing this, it's a seemingly balmy 20 degrees!), only a few things seem capable of breaking the chill. A great glass of red wine, preferably served in a cozy space, tops my list.

I found both nestled in a small Gahanna plaza alongside chains like First Watch and Starbucks. Cork Wine and Dine is a slimmed-down version of The Wine Bistro, a new concept from the owners of the retail-wine-shop-meets-restaurant. They wanted to expand their brand, offering a concept similar to The Wine Bistro, but on a smaller scale and in a high-traffic area where there wasn't space to build a larger concept.

Cork is a quaint 35-seater space with a row of bench-like soft seating and tables built for parties of two or four, plus a small bar toward the back. Despite the cold, this place was hopping on a weeknight with coworkers meeting up for happy hour, girlfriends out for the evening and a few couples on mid-week dates.

Wine flights come with a choice of three 2-ounce pours from a list of 20 options. There's a "wall of wine," as the servers call it: a selection of roughly 150 bottles from which diners are free to choose to enjoy with their meal. (I recommend a spicy and rich syrah/grenache blend from Tortoise Creek or a velvety rioja from Cepas Antiguas.)

The menu is not supposed to overlap with its Wine Bistro counterpart, but some dishes look familiar, including a list of three flatbreads (like Grape and Gorgonzola and Grilled Chicken Pesto) and a Braised Veal Meatball small plate. But there are plenty of new items from which to choose. The dishes we tried seem created from the same hand as the Wine Bistros-simple, easy to share, and with an Italian bent.

The Grilled Peasant Bread ($9) is great starter to share. It comes with warm bread and pita slices and a side of three spreads-a sweet and herby drunken shallot butter with roasted garlic, sauce-like roasted red pepper jam, and a thick caramelized onion dip heavy on fennel.

If in the mood for something hearty (and almost mac-and-cheese-like), try the Fusilli ($13), a heaping plate of pasta doused in Asiago cream sauce that gets brightness from shaved Brussels sprouts and fresh spinach, earthiness from cremini mushrooms and good crunch from crispy prosciutto and small garlic chips.

The menu is divided into starters, soups and salads, flatbreads, sandwiches and bigger plates, with specials available until 4 p.m. daily.