Artists start the annual Urban Scrawl festival with blank panels on which they'll create murals right in front of visitors' eyes. Don't miss this chance to see art in action.

Founded in 2007 at Dodge Park, Urban Scrawl (Aug. 29 to 30) is an arts festival where participating artists create an original mural over the course of two days. Artists are selected based on an application and examples of their work, says Lauren Wilson, a member of the Franklinton Arts District board and chair of Urban Scrawl. Last year, about 50 artists participated. "Half the artists have been doing this since year one," Wilson says. "But we're also constantly searching for new talent; it's a mix." What the artists paint is up them. Urban Scrawl doesn't provide any thematic guidelines or specifications (though the murals must be family-friendly). The completed panels will either be displayed throughout the neighborhood or included in the inaugural Art for Franklinton fundraiser benefiting Franklinton Arts District's new George Bellows Grant Program. Get to know five of this year's participating artists:

Kirsten Bowen: "Steinbeck," 2013

A graduate of the Columbus College of Art and Design, Bowen was a textile designer in New York City and then started a mural and finish business. Her career took a fine-art turn, and she began creating the paintings for which she's now known. In 2003, she opened the Kirsten Bowen Gallery in Bexley.

Chris Tennant: "Slur," 2012

Tennant creates mostly still lifes and portraits. He employs a unique style, applying paint heavily onto unusual textured surfaces. Tennant also works in a variety of media besides painting and is now making an all-ages coloring book.

Mandi Caskey: "The Crown Will Not Save You," 2014

Caskey has been interested in art since she was young. Her work is observant and reflective, and she sees her art as a means to express emotion and show life and truth. She's inspired by nature and travel.

Adam Crum: "A Form Created for Me to See," 2014

Born in Cleveland to two artist parents, Crum grew up in a creatively supportive household. In 1997, he moved to Columbus to attend CCAD, where he earned a bachelor of fine arts degree with a painting focus. Crum's work has appeared in both solo and group shows nationally and internationally. He is the visual manager at West Elm at Easton Town Center.

Andrew Lundberg: "Rescue," 2014

A mixed-media artist with a variety of expertise, Lundberg grew up near Chautauqua Lake, New York, and earned a degree in visual communications from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh. He spent 15 years in the professional design world but has been working full time as an artist for two years.