Interior designer Melinda Peters Elliott creates custom window treatments that enhance windows, rather than cover them. She knows which fabrics let a lot of light in, and what colors will complement the view, rather than take away from it.

Many of Melinda Peters Elliott's clients face a similar dilemma. They've designed homes with spectacular windows that are architecturally gorgeous, that let in loads of natural light, that overlook picture-perfect golf courses. They're exactly the kind of statement-making windows people don't want to cover up. But left bare, they feel cold.

"People feel that something's missing, but it's overwhelming, because it's so big," Peters Elliott said. "I love those types of situations."

The interior designer creates custom window treatments that enhance windows, rather than cover them. She knows which fabrics let a lot of light in, and what colors will complement the view, rather than take away from it.

Peggy Mosher admits she wasn't sure whether it'd be worth the effort and money to custom-design curtains for the irregular windows in her Grove City family room.

"At first it seemed like an extravagance, but it changed the whole feel of the room," Mosher said. She was so thrilled, in fact, she decided the kitchen and dining room needed custom treatments, too.

Peters Elliott has honed her skills during 18 years helming Fine Designs & Interiors in London, Ohio. After she graduated with a design degree from Georgia's Berry College, Peters Elliott returned to her hometown to start her own design business. She lives there with her husband and two sons, and is expecting her third child in September.

Her business is also more than a design studio. It's home to a gift shop selling Vera Bradley purses, Brighton jewelry, clothes, candles and made-in-house fudge, plus a coffee shop.

When she's designing window treatments for her clients, Peters Elliott does everything herself. She sketches her ideas, sews the treatments from scratch, whips up custom drapery rods and installs everything using her arsenal of drills, hammers and awls.

"The average do-it-yourselfer, they don't have the right tools, so it takes twice as long," Peters Elliott said. "I can decipher what a person needs much faster than they can, so the end result is quicker. And there are a lot less mistakes."

Peters Elliott has worked with local celebrities like Jim and Ellen Tressel-she's helping to decorate their Upper Arlington home right now-but says she can design within almost anyone's budget.

"It's all about the budget," she said. "I'm always very conscious to work with them to stay within a budget.