Fashion-savvy graphic designer Tyne Feheley admits to loving those moments on the town when strangers gush over her bubble dresses or ostrich feather skirts (always curious to know, as women are, where they can find it themselves). "It's kind of fun for me to give that little smirk," the 24-year-old said, "and say, 'My mom made it. You can't get it.' "

Fashion-savvy graphic designer Tyne Feheley admits to loving those moments on the town when strangers gush over her bubble dresses or ostrich feather skirts (always curious to know, as women are, where they can find it themselves). "It's kind of fun for me to give that little smirk," the 24-year-old said, "and say, 'My mom made it. You can't get it.' "

But after years of having her mother's design skills to herself, Tyne's secret is leaking out: Janet Feheley is one of Central Ohio's hidden gems, with an appreciation for fabulous material, a talent for sewing and a flair for fashion. And while the spunky 58-year-old Worthington woman never intended to become a fashion designer for anyone beyond herself and her family, that's exactly what is happening.

Feheley's passion for style began during childhood, watching Cher on TV. "I thought that I was like Cher. If she could wear it, I could wear it," Feheley said. "Just because I lived in Columbus, Ohio, it never dawned on me that I couldn't wear it."

The Worthington woman designed her first outfit in fourth grade when, while visiting her great-grandmother, she needed a dress for church. Together, they bought material at the five-and-dime, and Great Grandma helped her use the sewing machine to make a shift dress.

She and her mother - also a skilled sewer - eventually designed all of her high school dance dresses, and teamed up to create her aunt's wedding gown. Once she married and had children, she started sewing clothes for them, too.

Meanwhile, Feheley earned her degree in English education from Ohio State University and honed her artistic talents as a showroom designer for an interior design firm before leaving to be a stay-at-home mom to her children (stepson Matthew, now 34; son Brendan, 29; daughter Lawren, 26; and Tyne).

In the fall of 2008, while she and a friend shopped in the Powell home goods boutique Found, store owner Jana Leino complimented Feheley's blue and white dress. "She made it," her friend said. "She makes all her clothes."

Leino asked if Feheley would craft a few pieces for the store. After thinking on it-she didn't, after all, want her hobby to become a chore-Feheley said yes. "Needless to say, I was not happy about this," Tyne joked.

But Leino clearly was. Feheley's looks, from tiered dresses to Jackie-O-type sheaths, fit perfectly with Found's chic, unique vibe. And the price tags-typically $125 to $350-are quite modest for custom couture.

The first three dresses sold in two days.

"She now has a following, and whenever they need a special dress, they go to her," Leino said. Leino has also commissioned Feheley to make a couple of pieces for both her and her daughter. "I have several customers who probably have six, seven, eight of her dresses. When they used to go to Atlanta, New York or Chicago, they [now] go to Janet."

Feheley scours local shops for material, but also flies to New York to buy at the famed fabric store Mood. She keeps a closet at home filled with fabrics, and always begins her designs being inspired by them first.

Good style, she believes, is about fabulous materials and the right proportion. Her style is fun-and that's what she thinks people should have with fashion. "But with a really classy edge," she added. "I just don't like anything that looks cheap. I won't use cheap fabrics, period."

Feheley designs two labels. Her Thatcher line got its name from her great-grandmother Pansy Thatcher, who first taught her to use the Singer sewing machine. Her other line, Same Dress Different Day, features reversible dresses and is carried in Found.

Feheley, who works in marketing part-time, typically sews while watching sporting events on TV with her lawyer husband, Larry. "He doesn't mind that there are 125 yards of ostrich feathers on his pool table as we speak," she said, laughing. And despite keeping busy with work for others, she always makes time to sew for her girls, whether it's bridesmaid dresses for Lawren's wedding or a last-minute, gals-night-out skirt for Tyne.

While Tyne is certainly her mother's muse - the former University of Notre Dame diver is tiny, with a personality to pull off most anything - Feheley enjoys designing for all women. "I get really happy when I've made something that someone's thrilled with," she said. "Especially if their body type is not ideal, because I think it's harder for them to shop."

As for her price points, Feheley insists she simply designs for fun, not money. "I only put a minimal amount on for my time, because I basically just love it," she said. "This is just something that fulfills me." And thrills others.