ALEXANDER CITY, Ala. (AP) - The world was stunned by this year's release of Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Harper Lee's previously unpublished manuscript "Go Set a Watchman," but the fate of another book Lee worked on remains a mystery.

ALEXANDER CITY, Ala. (AP) The world was stunned by this year's release of Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist Harper Lee's previously unpublished manuscript "Go Set a Watchman," but the fate of another book Lee worked on remains a mystery.

Lee worked extensively on a true-crime novel based on string of deaths in rural Alabama in the 1970s. It involved a handsome country preacher, rumored to dabble in voodoo, whose relatives kept dying under mysterious circumstances. He was shot dead at his stepdaughter's funeral by the girl's uncle.

Attorney Tom Radney defended both the preacher and his killer, and Radney's widow says he shared all his files with Lee.

She said Lee gave him the beginning pages of a novel, and told him she wrote more but no trace of it has ever turned up.