Farmers markets today go beyond a few vegetable and fruit stands. We spoke with Jaime Moore, co-owner of Wayward Seed Farm and manager of the Dublin, Bexley and Worthington farmers markets, to learn more.

Farmers markets today go beyond a few vegetable and fruit stands. We spoke with Jaime Moore, co-owner of Wayward Seed Farm and manager of the Dublin, Bexley and Worthington farmers markets, to learn more.

What makes a farmers market great?

It's the recognition that you're a participant in the community that you're serving. It's not just a place of commerce; it's not just an exchange of money for food. You really have to work on giving back to the community.

How often do customers turn into vendors?

Sometimes, and the farmers market is the best kind of incubator. It's an opportunity to test recipes or products and the whole aesthetic of business.

What's a common misconception about farmers markets?

That everybody grows or bakes everything that's on their tables. We have vendors who partner with each other and put signs up if they're selling something that's not their own.

What challenges do you face?

Educating the consumer. To get people to understand why there may not be peaches this season or why asparagus is only here for two weeks. I'm always encouraging people to engage and get involved with the vendors