To celebrate International Coffee Day, Sept. 29, we detail where to find four global coffees in your own backyard.

Mexico is known for deep dark roasts with a sharp flavor. Guatemala's got a reputation for coffee that's full-bodied and sort of spicy. Colombia produces robust but sweet java. Despite its beloved (and deliciously addictive) universality, the taste of a coffee is as unique as the different regions that produce it. To celebrate International Coffee Day, Sept. 29, we detail where to find four global varieties in your own backyard.

Guatemala

A fruity acidity, balanced sweetness and a smooth, medium-thick texture are markers of Guatemala's contributions to the coffee scene.

Try: Jorge's Pick by Crimson Cup at RIDEhome. Floral, lemon and sugar notes complement this drink, whose namesake is Jorge De Leon Ovalle, a professional grader of Arabica beans and one of the world's most respected-and youngest-cuppers. 650 High St., Worthington, 614-468-1409, ride-home.com

Colombia

Deliciously and strongly scented, just a whiff of fresh-brewed Colombian could give you a caffeine high. Colombian coffees have a heavy body, light acidity and a nutty aftertaste.

Try: Colombia at Peet's Coffee & Tea. With hints of the cherry-like fruit that grows around the coffee bean, this full-bodied brew is brimming with a bright, sharp taste. 3645 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-441-9360; 2468 Northwest Blvd., Upper Arlington, 614-678-5719, peets.com

Brazil

This South American country is the world's largest coffee producer. If you see the word "natural" used to describe Brazilian beans, it means your java will have a nutty, sweet, heavy and long-lasting taste.

Try: Brasil Sitio da Laje at One Line Coffee. Notes of raspberry, plum, peach and cocoa sweeten the pot. 745 N. High St., Short North, 614-564- 9852, onelinecoffee.com

Ethiopia

Ethiopia is the birthplace of the world's favorite drink; legend has it a young Ethiopian farmer observed when his goats chomped on the berries of a specific plant, they frolicked home with a little more pep in their hooves. Ethiopian coffee has a thin body and medium acidity.

Try: Peace Coffee at Global Gallery. Made with beans from the country's Sidama region, Peace Coffee is a light roast with subtle hints of hibiscus and spice. 3535 N. High St., Clintonville, 614-262-5535, globalgallerycolumbus.com