Behind the counter at Crimson Cup are two tap handles. But don't expect beer to flow out of either. These draft lines are reserved solely for coffee that's been cold brewed and kegged.

Behind the counter at Crimson Cup are two tap handles. But don't expect beer to flow out of either. These draft lines are reserved solely for coffee that's been cold brewed and kegged.

The Clintonville coffee shop added coffee pushed through a nitrogen tap line a few months ago, starting with the house Ethiopian blend. Once one brew was on tap, Crimson Cup coffee training specialist Brandon Bir says, the owners began to wonder, why not add hops?

Now, customers can order Columbus' first dry-hopped, cold-brew coffee. "It's our ode to coffee and beer," Bir says. Creating the roast wasn't as easy as brewing a pot of coffee. The team experimented with a dozen styles of hops, settling on a varietal from Oregon with muted floral notes that would pair well with their Guatemalan blend's lemon and cocoa notes.

Coarse-ground coffee is cold brewed for 24 hours inside a 5-gallon bucket. Next, dry hops are added to the mixture and allowed to infuse for a few days. Once it reaches the right flavor, Bir pulls out the hops and kegs the coffee. "Who would think that you'd want to keg coffee?" he laughs.

The dry-hopped brew is served in an imperial stout glass, much like a beer would be. "It looks like you are pouring a Guinness," Bir says. "Out front, it hits you with that milky head. The body is incredible. The cocoa nibs come through, and the hops just hit you. It has a lot of floral notes that are beautiful."

While the debut version of hopped coffee is on tap for a limited time, Bir says expect more coffee experiments, including more styles of hopped coffee, to come. crimsoncup.com