From fresh new designers to more space, here are five reasons to stop by the Decorators' Showhouse this spring.

Ever wonder what a designer would do with an unlimited budget-and zero limits? To find out, head to the biennial Decorators' Showhouse (April 21 to May 10), during which the city's top interior and landscape designers will transform a stately, 19,000-square-foot Georgian manor in Muirfield Village. The fundraising event, hosted by the Women's Board of the Columbus Museum of Art, has been a favorite among designers and design enthusiasts for more than 40 years. Here are five reasons to visit this spring. Ever wonder what a designer would do with an unlimited budget-and zero limits? To find out, head to the biennial (April 21 to May 10), during which the city's top interior and landscape designers will transform a stately, 19,000-square-foot Georgian manor in Muirfield Village. The fundraising event, hosted by the Women's Board of the Columbus Museum of Art, has been a favorite among designers and design enthusiasts for more than 40 years. Here are five reasons to visit this spring.

This year's home is a stunner. "This isn't just a showhouse-it's a showhouse," says Barb Byrum, who serves as event co-chair with Stephanie Stephenson. "The detailing in there is exceptional. It's got the traditional architectural layout we look for in a showhouse, but it's so different, too." Two wings that "sort of meander on and on" will fascinate visitors, Byrum says. More space equals more design elements. Despite the home's incredible square footage, this year's show again features just 15 designers. That means each designer will receive a large area-as opposed to simply a room-in which to work. New faces. "We have a wonderful group of designers, some of whom are new to us this year and have never done a showhouse," Byrum says. "They bring a whole different perspective." The great room. The homeowners are world travelers, Byrum says, and the designer assigned to the home's central gathering space has plans to showcase this via African and Asian art and antiques. Of particular interest, Byrum says, is the ceiling: "You'll want to look up. There's a big surprise." The extras. Stop in the cafe for a bite to eat or a cup of coffee and check out the showhouse shop, which will feature items that mimic the designs you'll see in the home. The Trifles and Treasures sale features high-end items-from linen to silver-donated to the Women's Board specifically for the showhouse.