I've seen a monument to a Native American near a sled hill on the east side of the Scioto River off Riverside Drive in Dublin. What is the story behind it?

I've seen a monument to a Native American near a sled hill on the east side of the Scioto River off Riverside Drive in Dublin. What is the story behind it?

You've spotted one of two Native American memorials along Riverside Drive. The Bill Moose Memorial is on Wyandot Hill at Lane Road. It's a stack of boulders, one inscribed, "Bill Moose, Last of the Wyandots, Born 1837 and Whose Death in 1937 Marks the Passing of The Indians From This Territory." The monument is said to be located on Moose's grave. Born in Wyandot County, he grew up along the Scioto River in Franklin County and worked odd jobs that included arrow-making. In the 1880s, he was in the Wild West show of the Sells Brothers Circus but came back to Columbus in 1915. Living in a shack near Morse and Sinclair roads, Bill regularly had free meals at Wyandot Country Club while wearing full Indian regalia.

At 7377 Riverside Drive is "Leatherlips," a 1990 sculpture by Boston artist Ralph Helmick. A large head of layered limestone, it emerges from a hillside above the Scioto and has long, flowing hair; tourists are able to pose atop the head for photos. Leatherlips was born in 1732 and was a Wyandot chief who later in life urged cooperation with white settlers; his name came from his reputation for always keeping a promise. His brother Roundhead, however, condemned him for his friendliness with whites and in 1810 ordered him to be executed. Legend holds his death by tomahawk took place at what is now Olentangy Indian Caverns on Home Road in Delaware County.

Jeff Darbee is a preservationist, historian and author in Columbus. Send your questions to cityquotient@columbusmonthly.com, and the answer might appear in a future column.

Sources: Greater Columbus Arts Council, Guide to Outdoor Sculpture in Columbus, 1988