Here's something you don't hear too often: Print is very much alive. Yes, digital is changing our lives, and it has revolutionized the media. But you can't look at the press as a monolith. Magazines are a different breed.

Here's something you don't hear too often: Print is very much alive. Yes, digital is changing our lives, and it has revolutionized the media. But you can't look at the press as a monolith. Magazines are a different breed.

Let me share a few facts based on various studies compiled by the Association of Magazine Media:

More than 90 percent of U.S. adults read print magazines. People younger than 35 read more print magazines than people older than 35. "Consumers trust and are more inspired and influenced by magazine media than TV." "Brands achieve higher brand favorability and purchase intent in print magazine ads than they do online or on TV."

I could go on.

So I will.

There are a number of digital-only media companies that now publish magazines, including Angie's List, Politico and (of all things) Paperless Post.

Mary Berner, president of the Association of Magazine Media, has said, "Each time one of these players launches a print magazine, the reasons cited are remarkably similar: print deeply engages consumers and delivers a tangibility, permanence and credibility that no other media offers."

This is not to diminish the impact of digital, which is a vital addition to the ways we reach readers. The key is the word "addition," as in a complement to and not a replacement of.

None of this matters, of course, unless we deliver a magazine worth engaging with. To me, a city magazine such as Columbus Monthly is about two powerful elements: explanation and discovery.

Explanation is helping readers understand how a region works and why decisions get made on anything from power to poverty. These are the in-depth, authoritative reports on the people and issues of the day-the stories behind the headlines.

Discovery is sharing the cool and useful things we come across, whether it's a new restaurant, a boutique or, in the case of this issue, a best doctor and a highly ranked school.

It's vital we provide value. When the magazine arrives, it should feel as if you've received a gift that you want to lean back and unwrap-finding high-quality paper, crisp printing, vivid design, compelling photography and gripping stories. Every detail on every page counts.

A magazine is like a guest in your home, and we strive to produce one that shows up with a conversational portfolio of anecdotes that will entertain and inform. We want to be that smart, insightful and occasionally playful guest that you look forward to inviting again.

If we do that, there is a sustainable and vibrant future for print magazines, most especially Columbus Monthly-a publication with which I'm somewhat familiar.

My roots with the magazine began as a staff writer when Les Wexner was just a really rich guy who had not yet developed Easton, discovered New Albany or donated a few bucks to Ohio State University. I eventually became editor before leaving in 2012 to serve as publisher of a growing magazine division in Southwest Florida.

After nearly three years in Naples-enduring its insufferable winters filled with one sunny, warm day after another-I recently accepted an offer to return to work with the many talented professionals at Dispatch Magazines, which also includes Columbus CEO, Columbus Alive, Columbus Weddings and other affiliated publications.

Our goal is to deliver a gift to you on all of our platforms. Especially print.