Owners Barbara Reynolds and German Vasquez moved from Miami to open the Bottle Shop. "We wanted a really comfortable space that had a bar, a market and a patio," Reynolds says. Their search led them to Victorian Village's long-time Viking carryout.

The Bottle Shop Bar & Marketopened in Victorian Village late last year, replacing the long-time Viking carryout. The market aspect of the business remains, but the space underwent a substantial remodel to include a cocktail bar on one side.

The contrast between the two halves is a little funny at first. The market side feels more like the traditional corner carryout: white tile floors, bright fluorescent lighting, cigarettes behind the counter. The craft beer selection is reduced in size but still notable: many local and regional brands are represented. And while you pick up your favorite IPA, you can also shop for boxed mac & cheese and shaving cream.

Contrast this with the cocktail lounge, separated from the market by half walls and heavy curtains. The space is darker and quieter, with a bar in one corner, a station for filling growlers and a screen on the wall showing classic movies. The design combines elements of a 1920s speakeasy and a 1990s coffee shop.

Owners Barbara Reynolds and German Vasquez moved from Miami to open the Bottle Shop. "We wanted a really comfortable space that had a bar, a market and a patio," Reynolds says. Their search led them to the Viking listing in Columbus. Reynolds-a Dublin native-says they didn't plan to come this far north, but, "We walked into the space and saw the potential to turn it into what we wanted to do."

Reynolds says they hope to appeal to novice cocktail drinkers and seasoned aficionados alike. "The downfall of a lot of cocktail bars is that they can tend toward the pretentious," she says, "We want to be really welcoming. No one's going to roll their eyes at you if you want to drink a vodka cranberry. I'll make you gin and tonics all day long."

The cocktail list is arranged chronologically to trace the development of libations from the Archaic Age (1783–1830) through the New Age (1987 to the present). Each listing details the cocktail's creator and year of origin. Guests can sip on classics like an Old Fashioned or a Sazerac, or a relatively new cocktail like the Black Flip, made with dark rum, stout, demerara sugar and a whole egg. Reynolds says they've been impressed with customers' willingness to explore beyond the menu as well.

Reynolds and Vasquez also inherited 20 beer taps from the previous establishment. They serve pints in-house and fill growlers to go, often filling them at happy hour pricing and waiving filling charges if guests bring their own growlers.

The duo is also renovating a food truck to park out front.