My Polish husband always keeps an emergency supply of pierogis in the freezer. And, until recently, I must admit the stash was typically a box or two of Mrs. T's. He'd admit they weren't the best-but they'd sate his cravings in a city that's never been brimming with readily accessible potato-stuffed dumplings.

My Polish husband always keeps an emergency supply of pierogis in the freezer. And, until recently, I must admit the stash was typically a box or two of Mrs. T's. He'd admit they weren't the best-but they'd sate his cravings in a city that's never been brimming with readily accessible potato-stuffed dumplings.

Before you potato and cheese purists scoff at these flavor combos, let me establish maker Matt Majesky's Eastern European cred. A teacher by trade, Majesky uses his Polish great-grandmother's pierogi recipe for a traditional shell (the flavor brings me back to pierogi I used to buy every weekend from church ladies in Cleveland) that's not-too-thick, not-too-thin. This makes for a great dough-to-stuffing ratio-enough mashed filling to be hearty and flavorful, but not so much that, with one bite, you end up with a mushy blob on your plate.

For dinner on Monday, we busted out packages of smoked potato cheddar-very smoky and rich-and bacon, Swiss and horseradish-salty and tangy, like a mini Polish Reuben. Butter-fried crisp on the outside for a little crunch and served with sauteed onions, they were a great comfort food meal.

How do you score these delightful dumplings? You'll find them in the frozen section at Weiland's Market and Kolache Republic, or you can head to Cafe Bourbon Street to eat there or take home daily (except Mondays) starting at 7 p.m. Bonus: Tuesday is $1 pierogi night (saving you roughly 50 cents per dumpling).

Majesky's offerings rotate weekly. To keep up with what he's cooking, follow his Facebook page.