Celeste Nolan of Laurel Valley Creamery confesses she screws up two batches of cheese every spring. "The chemistry of making cheese from spring to summer to winter to fall, it changes," she says. As the cows munch on different grasses throughout the year, the level of acid in their milk fluctuates. And because making cheese is all about the pH (acid develops faster in spring milk), a slight miscalculation can mean a vat of cheese that doesn't set right.

Celeste Nolan of Laurel Valley Creamery confesses she screws up two batches of cheese every spring. “The chemistry of making cheese from spring to summer to winter to fall, it changes,” she says. As the cows munch on different grasses throughout the year, the level of acid in their milk fluctuates. And because making cheese is all about the pH (acid develops faster in spring milk), a slight miscalculation can mean a vat of cheese that doesn’t set right.

Green grass makes yellow milk, and therefore yellow cheese. In the winter, when the cows feast mostly on hay, cheeses will come out white. Some cheese companies will color cheese for a consistent look, but not Laurel Valley.

The cows’ diet can alter the flavor, too, adds Nick Nolan of Laurel Valley. “A snapshot of the best grass of the year in May will roll out in January,” he says. “You cut into it, and you can relive that moment when you were running the cows that morning. All that day was captured in a wheel.”