Smell it first, says Kent Rand of Weiland's Market. Then, consider the texture-the way it interacts with your teeth. Does it have bite? Next, pay attention to the way the cheese reacts on the inside of your cheeks and back of your tongue. "If it's complex, it might start off a little slow, then attack the entire mouth," Rand says.

Smell it first, says Kent Rand of Weiland’s Market. Then, consider the texture—the way it interacts with your teeth. Does it have bite? Next, pay attention to the way the cheese reacts on the inside of your cheeks and back of your tongue. “If it’s complex, it might start off a little slow, then attack the entire mouth,” Rand says.

Don’t serve it cold. “It really should have been out at room temperature for 2 to 3 hours,” Kast says. “Getting the chill off is only part of the equation. You want to get it so the flavor actually develops, and that takes a little while.”

To store cheese, wrap it up in light foil and a plastic bag. “You need the cheese to breathe because it’s alive. You want to give it air. I put it in a plastic bag because it doesn’t absorb whatever’s in the fridge,” Rand says.

If it gets a little moldy, simply cut off the moldy part and eat the rest. “Don’t be afraid to scrape it off. As long as it doesn’t start to taste like ammonia or smell like ammonia you should be fine,” Rand says.

Buying your cheese shrink-wrapped? Let the cheese breathe before you enjoy it. “Never really judge a cheese when you first open it,” Rand says.