Local cheesemongers Kent Rand of Weiland's Market and Mike Kast of Curds & Whey share advice on how to let cheese shine with the right beer and wine pairing.

Local cheesemongers Kent Rand of Weiland’s Market and Mike Kast of Curds & Whey share advice on how to let cheese shine with the right beer and wine pairing.

Fulton Creek Jersey Leerdammer

“It’s a great, Dutch-style cheese. The creaminess of the cheese stands up to the acidity of the beer,” Rand says.

Kokoborrego

Owl Creek Tomme “It’s nice and chewy and stays on your palate for quite a while,” Rand says. “It’s kind of begging for a nice cold beer to wash it down.”

Blue Jacket Dairy Feta

“Feta’s a great beer cheese,” says Rand, suggesting pairing the mild cheese with wheat beer.

Canal Junction Burr Oak

Sync this nutty, yeasty and slightly sweet parmesan-style cheese with an IPA. “It has a little bit of acid that hits the side of your tongue and makes your mouth happy,” Rand says. He also suggests reaching for Canal Junction’s Wabash Erie Canal, a gruyere-style cheese, to pair with a more malty beer.

Kokoborrego Headwaters Tomme

Buttery and slightly acidic, this cow’s milk cheese has a stripe of ash in the center. It partners great with petite sirah, tempranillo or cabernet. “More buttery cheeses usually work with your more tannic reds,” Kast says.

Laurel Valley Creamery Gruyere “Gruyere can be chewy and strong and nutty, so you have to have a big wine to hold up to that big cheese,” Rand says. In this case, he recommends a zinfandel. For a white option, Kast suggests an off-dry riesling.

Mackenzie Creamery Goat Cheese“Soft goat cheeses and sauvignon blanc is a marriage made in heaven,” Kast says. “The mineral structure of the wine works off the slight acidity of the cheese. That’s a real classic.” If you’re looking for a red option, sometimes pinot noir will work, he adds. “It’s got that kind of fruity almost strawberry quality that works well with goat cheese.”

Blue Jacket Dairy Bokengehalas“That’s so nice and dry and piquant and it has such a full mouth feel,” Rand says. He suggests pairing this sheep’s milk cheese with a lighter cabernet sauvignon—a wine with body but that’s not overpowering.