It's like bagel magic: Fill out a form online, and the next morning a tightly stapled brown paper bag is delivered to your front door. Stuck to it is a white sheet of paper announcing the contents: a baker's dozen of assorted fresh bagels, from egg to everything, marbled rye to cinnamon crunch.

It's like bagel magic: Fill out a form online, and the next morning a tightly stapled brown paper bag is delivered to your front door. Stuck to it is a white sheet of paper announcing the contents: a baker's dozen of assorted fresh bagels, from egg to everything, marbled rye to cinnamon crunch.

Even if you've never ordered home delivery, you've likely tried Sammy's Bagels. You'll find these New York-style bagels at eateries and coffee shops around town, including Katzinger's and Stauf's. Whether you know it or not, you've probably been enjoying true New York-style bagels.

Sam Pullano-the Sam behind the Sammy-is an experienced bagel maker. The Teaneck, New Jersey, native spent his teenage years running deliveries for Manhattan's Jumbo Bagels, where he learned the process of making bagels before opening his first shops in New Jersey and New York in 1992 (he sold them in 2000).

Friends in Ohio led him here. He opened an Italian restaurant in Athens in the early 1990s and, even then, moving to the state capital was on his radar. "Columbus has a great food taste," he says. "You can get anything. There's a reason why it's a test market." What he saw in Columbus was room for more bagels.

He opened his first local stores in 1994, the busiest of which sat at James Road and Broad Street until 2008. Over the years as his wholesale accounts, including Ohio State and Nationwide, eclipsed retail sales, he closed his shops. Now, bagel production never stops.

Pullano's bagel-making is a mix of hand-craftsmanship and big machinery. Bagels are mixed in 100-pound batches and then transferred by hand to machines that divide and wrap the dough into the familiar doughnut shape. The machines form nearly 1,500 bagels per hour, with weekly production topping 60,000 to 75,000 bagels in 25 varieties.

Bakers lay bagels on boards for proofing and overnight chilling. True New York bagels, or water bagels, are boiled in a kettle before hitting the oven. "It's considered a sacrilege to skip it," Pullano says with a laugh, adding most New York bakeries still boil their bagels, which produces a shinier, crispier exterior and a denser, chewier interior.

Inside Pullano's nondescript Bexley warehouse, bagels are boiled 300 at a time, after which they're loaded onto wooden racks in groups of six and slipped into the oven. Two minutes later, they're flipped upside down off the racks and baked for 12 minutes more.

With his fleet of vans delivering bagels all over Central Ohio, it was easy for Pullano to add home delivery about four years ago. Today, he figures he does about 100 home deliveries a week. Pullano's spreading the word through "neighborhood blitzes," delivering free bagels to residents with notes on how to order more. He says once customers grasp the concept, they're easily sold. "You wake up on a Saturday morning, and there's bagels and cream cheese at your door," he explains. "That's gotta make you happy." sammysbagels.net

Nicholas Dekker blogs about breakfast at breakfastwithnick.com. His book, "Breakfast With Nick: Columbus," is a complete guidebook to the morning meal.