Vino Vino owners Peter and Laurie Danis found their green-ringed Steelite (the Cadillac dishware) plates in Portland, Oregon. Or maybe it was Sarasota, Florida. Either way, the Danises definitely found them by traveling and visiting restaurants. "We're that crazy couple that when we're eating, we raise the plate above our heads to see who the manufacturer is," Peter says. "We do that all time."

Vino Vino owners Peter and Laurie Danis found their green-ringed Steelite (the Cadillac dishware) plates in Portland, Oregon. Or maybe it was Sarasota, Florida. Either way, the Danises definitely found them by traveling and visiting restaurants. "We're that crazy couple that when we're eating, we raise the plate above our heads to see who the manufacturer is," Peter says. "We do that all time."

Peter chose his plate ware for two reasons: to accentuate certain features of menu items, and to distinguish Vino Vino from its white-plated sister restaurant, Figlio. The green ring, he says, complements specific dishes. "Our portobello mushroom ravioli has a brown color, and we wanted something to set those browns and tans off."

Peter uses the green ring as a form of hidden messaging-the color is sprinkled throughout the restaurant. "I think that there's a very holistic way that people experience a restaurant," Peter says. "All the factors-the music, the attire, the eating-and then, of course, you get down to tableware. It's not every plate. We didn't want them all to be the same. It's about subliminal messages." vinovinocolumbus.com