The plates at The Top haven't changed in 60 years. The Homer Laughlin dishes, adorned with the restaurant's iconic logo and an ombre black edge, are as classic as the restaurant's steak au poivre and baked potatoes with ice cream scoop-sized mounds of sour cream.

The plates at The Top haven't changed in 60 years. The Homer Laughlin dishes, adorned with the restaurant's iconic logo and an ombre black edge, are as classic as the restaurant's steak au poivre and baked potatoes with ice cream scoop-sized mounds of sour cream.

The only thing that's changed is how the dishes come to the Bexley steakhouse. "It used to be a one-on-one relationship [with Homer Laughlin]," says co-owner Regina Adkins, who now orders them locally through restaurant equipment wholesaler Wasserstrom. "It's not so anymore. But we would never change companies."

"I had a gentleman last night who wanted to buy a dozen plates," Adkins says. "I'm not a collector, so it's interesting to me that someone would want a dozen plates." (She said yes.)

Although dishes leave the restaurant, some find their way back home. People return plates from The Top that they've found in garage sales and home auctions, Adkins says. A year ago, a gentleman brought in four sets of (legally obtained) dishes from his mother's 1956 wedding reception.

And how do 59-year-old plates compare with the ones Adkins orders from Wasserstrom today? "They look exactly the same," she says. thetopsteakhouse.com