Some photographers can help you capture your wedding in more than just still images.

This story first appeared in the Fall/Winter 2018 issue of Columbus Weddings, published in June 2018.

As Megan King was weighing how to best document her October 2016 wedding, she first focused on hiring a photographer.

King’s stepmother, she recalls, recommended AddVision Studios. The vendor’s location, near Worthington Hills, was a hop, skip and jump from where King grew up (and where she and her husband, Brett, currently reside). The bride-to-be was soon sold on the studio.

“They were wonderful to work with,” King says. “Stereotypically speaking, guys can maybe not get quite as excited about the picture part as brides do, but they made Brett feel so comfortable and just himself.”

When King, who was aware that AddVision also provides videography services, made up her mind that she wanted both still and moving pictures, she knew where to turn.

“They were able to jump right in,” says King. “It made it so much easier to have everyone under one roof.”

Experts say couples are increasingly drawn to vendors that offer both photography and videography, like AddVision.

“You don’t wake up a week from the wedding and go, ‘Man, I really wish we went with chicken instead of filet,’ ” says Bryce Koechlin of AddVision. “The video is the one thing [that] if they don’t get, they wish they did.”

A potential for cost savings is among the benefits of hiring one vendor to do both jobs. Koechlin says his company offers bundle pricing for those who opt for both services.

Aesthetic considerations can be just as important as financial ones, however. Husband-and-wife duo Caleb and Meg Sanchez of Sanchez Studio say that the photos and videos they produce are designed to go hand-in-hand.

“When we shoot both, I shoot all the photos and Meg does all the video, and we don’t hire a second shooter,” Caleb says. “Meg and I have a very similar eye.”

Video is a vibrant part of their business; according to Caleb, about 40 percent of clients seek photography alone, but the remaining 60 percent is divided between couples who want photography and videography, or videography alone. The studio offers a range of video packages, including a 3-to-5-minute film with highlights and an 8-to-10-minute film featuring an audio message and the reading of vows.

“We always say to couples, to convince them that doing video is worth it, [that video allows them] to re-live their day in a way that they never would be able to by looking through their photos,” says Meg.

Among the studio’s satisfied clients is Tiffany White, who married Jonathan in August 2017. She was glad to find a company with the ability to point and click and select “record.”

“I had heard of other people saying, ‘We hired another videographer, and we got this really boring footage of our wedding that didn’t have any personality,’” White says. “We got both sides—we got great photos, but we also got a fun video."